Transferrable Pathways – Rio Tinto

Rio Tinto is actively cultivating a safe, respectful and inclusive workplace with a focus on values-based performance and a commitment to diversity. The Transferable Pathways Program (TPP) identified transferrable skills from non-mining backgrounds and recruited experienced women with these skills into leadership, planning, and project advisory roles. Launched in 2022, the program attracted over 1,500 diverse applicants, successfully placing 32 participants in roles during its pilot phase. 

The initiative stemmed from the Everyday Respect Report, emphasising the need for a more inclusive workforce by increasing the representation of women and Indigenous people in the business. The program’s success is evidenced by its recruitment strategies, onboarding processes, and the centralisation of support delivered through a people-centred framework. 

The Transferable Pathways Program not only welcomed women into mining without requiring industry experience, it also contributed to cultural change by challenging traditional recruitment pathways. It increased visibility, broadened the talent pool, and increased diversity not only in Rio Tinto but across the resource industry. The program’s effectiveness in addressing turnover, labour shortages, and employee satisfaction has prompted plans for expansion, reflecting a positive step towards a workplace culture that values differences and removes barriers to enhance diversity.

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Rio Tinto is actively cultivating a safe, respectful and inclusive workplace with a focus on values-based performance and a commitment to diversity. The Transferable Pathways Program (TPP) identified transferrable skills from non-mining backgrounds and recruited experienced women with these skills into leadership, planning, and project advisory roles. Launched in 2022, the program attracted over 1,500 diverse applicants, successfully placing 32 participants in roles during its pilot phase. 

The initiative stemmed from the Everyday Respect Report, emphasising the need for a more inclusive workforce by increasing the representation of women and Indigenous people in the business. The program’s success is evidenced by its recruitment strategies, onboarding processes, and the centralisation of support delivered through a people-centred framework. 

The Transferable Pathways Program not only welcomed women into mining without requiring industry experience, it also contributed to cultural change by challenging traditional recruitment pathways. It increased visibility, broadened the talent pool, and increased diversity not only in Rio Tinto but across the resource industry. The program’s effectiveness in addressing turnover, labour shortages, and employee satisfaction has prompted plans for expansion, reflecting a positive step towards a workplace culture that values differences and removes barriers to enhance diversity.